Official website of the Paralympic Movement
Contrast:
High Contrast
Normal Contrast
Enlargement:
Larger Font Size
Default Font Size
Smaller Font Size
Powerlifting

Preview: Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games powerlifting competition

Nearly 40 athletes from 15 countries will compete in four medal events at the Commonwealth Games.

An athlete poses showing his gold medal. © •
By IPC

Jawad, 25, smashed the world record in April with a lift of 190kg to secure gold in the up to 59kg weight class at the 2014 IPC Powerlifting World Championships in Dubai, UAE.

England’s recently crowned world champion Ali Jawad will be one of nearly 40 athletes from 15 countries taking part in powerlifting at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games which get underway on Wednesday (23 July).

In total there will be four powerlifting medal events in Glasgow at the SECC Precinct which will take place on Saturday (2 August).

Jawad, 25, smashed the world record in April with a lift of 190kg to secure gold in the up to 59kg weight class at the 2014 IPC Powerlifting World Championships in Dubai, UAE.

In Glasgow, despite competing against opponents who are much heavier than him, Jawad will still start as strong favourite for Commonwealth gold alongside Nigeria’s Ifeanya Nnajiofor.

Like Jawad, Nnajiofor lifted 190kg at April’s World Championships, but could only manage seventh place as he was competing in the up to 72kg category, for heavier lifters.

Other contenders include Australia’s Abede Fekadu, a two-time Paralympian whose best international finish was sixth at the 2010 World Championships and India’s Farman Basha, a three-time Paralympian who finished fourth at Beijing 2008.

Another Glasgow 2014 powerlifter who set a world record in Dubai to win a world title is Nigeria’s Esther Oyema who will compete in the women’s lightweight division (up to 61kg).

Oyema lifted 125kg in April in the up to 55kg class, and despite her weight disadvantage in Glasgow, should still have enough to win gold. England’s Natalie Blake finished fifth behind Oyema in Dubai and will be optimistic of making the podium as will South Africa’s Chantell Stierman.

The men’s heavyweight (from 72kg) competition is likely to be a contest between two Malaysians lifters who have both recorded lifts of 195kg this year.

Yee Khie Jong is currently ranked 10th in the world in the up to 97kg division, whilst teammate Mohd Shahmil Md Saad is ranked 7th in the up to 107kg class.

Australia’s Jessica Gray will start as favourite in the women’s heavyweight class (from 61kg).

For further information, please visit the Glasgow 2014 website.

World silver medallist Rostami suspended for Anti-Doping Violation

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) has announced that Iranian world silver medallist powerlifter Roohallah Rostami has been suspended and fined for an Anti-Doping Rule violation.

Anti-Doping Laboratory Analysts Myriam Kabu (L) and Damon Maheux work in the anti-doping laboratory which tested athlete’s samples from the London 2012 Games © • Getty Images
By IPC

As a signatory of the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC), the IPC remains committed to a doping free sporting environment at all levels.

Rostami returned an adverse analytical finding for Methylhexaneamine in a urine sample provided on 7 April 2014 following his participation at the IPC Powerlifting World Championships in Dubai, UAE. This substance is included on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) 2014 Prohibited List under the category S6. Stimulants and is prohibited in-competition.

As a result of his violation, Rostami will be ineligible from competition for two years from 7 April 2014 and has been fined EUR 1,500.

All Rostami’s results obtained from the date of the test and onwards will be disqualified with all the resulting consequences including forfeiture of any medals, points, records and prizes. This includes the world silver medal he won on 7 April in the men’s up to 72kg. As a result, Russia’s bronze medallist Sergei Sychev will now receive the silver and China’s Peng Hu will move up from fourth to bronze.

The principle of strict liability applies to anti-doping matters. Therefore, each athlete is strictly liable for the substances found in his or her sample, and that an anti-doping rule violation occurs whenever a prohibited substance (or its metabolites or markers) is found in his or her bodily specimen, whether or not the athlete intentionally or unintentionally used a prohibited substance or was negligent or otherwise at fault.

As a signatory of the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC), the IPC remains committed to a doping free sporting environment at all levels. The IPC, together with the International Federations and the National Paralympic Committees, established the IPC Anti-Doping Code to prevent doping in sport for Paralympic athletes, in the spirit of fair play. The IPC Anti-Doping Code is in conformity with the general principles of the WADC.

Two powerlifters suspended for Anti-Doping Rule violations

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) has announced that two powerlifters – Russia’s Ilfat Mukhatarov and Colombia’s Ivan Palacios - have been suspended and fined for separate Anti-Doping Rule violations.

Anti-Doping Laboratory Analysts Myriam Kabu (L) and Damon Maheux work in the anti-doping laboratory which tested athlete’s samples from the London 2012 Games © • Getty Images
By IPC

Mukhatarov returned an adverse analytical finding for Indapamide in a urine sample provided on 4 April 2014 during an out of competition test ahead of the IPC Powerlifting World Championships in Dubai, UAE. This substance is included on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) 2014 Prohibited List under the category S5. Diuretic and Masking Agents and is prohibited both in and out of competition. As a result of his violation, Mukhatarov will be ineligible from competition for two years from 4 April 2014 and fined EUR 1,500.

Palacios tested positive for Chlorothiazide and Hydrochlorothiazide in a urine sample provided on 28 March 2014 after he had competed at the 2014 Para South American Games in Santiago, Chile.

This substance is included on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) 2014 Prohibited List under the category S5. Diuretic and Masking Agents and is prohibited both in and out of competition.

As the Hearing Panel was satisfied that Palacios had taken the substance for legitimate medical purposes and not to enhance his performance, his suspension and fine were reduced to one year beginning on 28 March 2014 and EUR 750.

For both athletes, all results obtained from the date of the test and onwards, will be disqualified with all the resulting consequences including forfeiture of any medals, points, records and prizes.

The principle of strict liability applies to anti-doping matters. Therefore, each athlete is strictly liable for the substances found in his or her sample, and that an anti-doping rule violation occurs whenever a prohibited substance (or its metabolites or markers) is found in his or her bodily specimen, whether or not the athlete intentionally or unintentionally used a prohibited substance or was negligent or otherwise at fault.

As a signatory of the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC), the IPC remains committed to a doping free sporting environment at all levels. The IPC, together with the International Federations and the National Paralympic Committees, established the IPC Anti-Doping Code to prevent doping in sport for Paralympic athletes, in the spirit of fair play. The IPC Anti-Doping Code is in conformity with the general principles of the WADC.

For further information, please visit the IPC website.

Jawad: World record in Dubai was ‘career defining’

Great Britain’s Ali Jawad arrived at the 2014 IPC Powerlifting World Championships with the aim of casting aside disappointment which started at Beijing 2008.

Ali Jawad Great Britain's Ali Jawad reacts after a lift in front of his home crowd at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. © • Getty Images
By Caryn Maconi | for the IPC

“Since the heartbreak of London 2012, I promised myself I would never feel anything like that again on an international platform”

Great Britain’s Ali Jawad has spoken candidly about how his world record lift at the 2014 IPC Powerlifting World Championships finally allowed him to lay the ghosts of Beijing 2008 and London 2012 to rest.

“The performance in Dubai was career-defining,” Jawad said. “I felt so relieved that all the sacrifice and hard work had paid off, and finally I would not be considered as the ‘nearly man’ of the sport. It showed that with hard work, I could come back from adversity and succeed.”

In Dubai, UAE, Jawad, 25, hauled 190kg to add 5kg onto his own world record in the men’s -59kg.

“Since the heartbreak of London 2012, I promised myself I would never feel anything like that again on an international platform,” he said.

Jawad was born without legs and grew up competing at an international level in judo. He discovered the sport of powerlifting in 2006, and two years later was set to represent Great Britain at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. The night before his competition, though, Jawad fell ill.

Though he still competed, the medal favourite turned in a disappointing ninth-place finish. Eight months later, Jawad found out that his illness was due to Crohn’s disease, an inflammatory condition that affects the intestines. He has been living with the disease, and still competing at the elite level, ever since.

At the London 2012 Paralympic Games, Jawad had hoped to erase the memory of Beijing. Though he turned in a much better performance than he had in 2008, he narrowly missed the podium with a devastating fourth-place finish in front of his home crowd.

Those set-backs now seem like a distant memory.

The road to Rio – history in the making?

Now that Jawad has finally bagged an international title, he can look towards raising the bar even further.

No athlete with Crohn’s disease has ever won gold at the Olympic or Paralympic Games, something which Jawad hopes to change at Rio 2016.

“It has been a roller coaster journey suffering with Crohn’s disease,” Jawad said. “Not many doctors believed I could compete at the world class level, and they advised me to retire. But I’m the type of person who sees the end goal and will not be satisfied until I achieve it. I have one goal in Rio 2016, and that is to win the gold medal.”

For Jawad, victory in Rio would mean more than personal glory, it would also be a chance to inspire people with Crohn’s disease worldwide.

“My sole motivation in training is to try to push the boundaries of what the human body can tolerate with Crohn’s disease,” Jawad said. “I have had the dream of winning Paralympic gold since I was six years old, and I want to fight for my dream.”

Before that, the Leeds based powerhouse is preparing for the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games in July, where he aims to add yet more to his world record with an historic 200kg lift.

“Gender parity at the Paralympic Games is our goal,” says Sir Philip Craven

Speaking at the 6th International Working Group (IWG) World Conference on Women and Sport in Helsinki, Finland, the IPC President outlined the Paralympic Movement's long term ambition.

Sir Philip Craven Sir Philip Craven the President of the International Paralympic Committee speaks to the International Paralympic Committee Governing Board prior to the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games © • Getty Images

"Increasing participation is not easy, especially in countries where there are cultural barriers to women practicing sport. Role models are essential and I am delighted to see so many female Paralympians coming through who can inspire the next generation.”

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) is targeting gender parity at future Paralympic Games in terms of participation and the number of medal events for each sex, according to its President Sir Philip Craven.

Speaking at the opening of this week’s 6th International Working Group (IWG) World Conference on Women and Sport in Helsinki, Finland, Sir Philip said much had been done to increase female participation in para-sport since the formation of the IPC Women in Sport Committee in 2002.

“By 2016 around 1,650 women, roughly 38 per cent of all athletes, will compete in the Rio Paralympic Games, more than double the 790 who took part in Atlanta in 1996,” the 63-year-old five-time Paralympian told the audience.

“Women will also compete in 43 per cent of all medal events, a 12 per cent rise on London 2012.”

Sir Philip said that it is not as simple for the IPC as introducing a 50/50 split in participation and events at the next Games and that the move towards gender parity would take time.

Sir Philip said: “The growth has to be organic and has to come from the grassroots. It is no-use creating more medal events for women if there are not enough athletes to compete at the highest level.

“Increasing participation is not easy, especially in countries where there are cultural barriers to women practicing sport. Role models are essential and I am delighted to see so many female Paralympians coming through who can inspire the next generation.”

As well as highlighting how athletes such as Dutch blade runner Marlou van Rhijn and Iranian Paralympic champion archer Zarah Nemati are inspiring more women to take up sport, Sir Philip also spoke about the importance of increasing the number of female coaches too.

“It is important that strategies are implemented to increase the number of female elite coaches who can not only train more women, but also more men.

“Jenny Archer, the coach of Great Britain’s David Weir, a six-time Paralympic champion in wheelchair racing, is perfect evidence of how a woman can rise to the top in international coaching and succeed.”

Sir Philip, who is serving his fourth term as IPC President, added that in addition to increasing participation on the field of play more needs to be done off it to bring more women into leadership roles within sporting organisations.

He explained that last year’s IPC Governing Board elections - when just four of the 27 candidates seeking election were women - was evidence that the Paralympic Movement must do more.

“Across the whole IPC membership – covering National Paralympic Committees, International Sport Federations and Organisations and Regional Organisations - just 24 per cent of all key decision making positions are taken by women,” said Sir Philip, who pointed to the Agitos Foundation’s WoMentoring project as a possible solution to increasing the figure to 30 per cent in the near future.

“The mentoring project, which is initially a pilot targeting Europe, involves 32 women from 20 IPC member organisations and the aim is that over the next two years mentees will gain and develop the tools and knowledge to continue to make their mark in sport.

“The mentors are experienced in a wide variety of sports organisations from both within and outside the Paralympic Movement, whilst the mentees are equally as varied, from athletes and coaches to secretaries and even some existing board members.

“If successful, the pilot will be rolled out globally and hopefully soon we can see the same progress off the field of the play as we have seen on it in recent years.”

In closing his speech, Sir Philip summed up what was needed in six words.

“Quite simply, sport needs more women!”

Why I did not attempt 300kg in Dubai

The reigning World Champion reveals it was intervention by his coaches which prevented him from going further at the 2014 IPC Powerlifting World Championships, but that he will go for 300kg at the Incheon 2014 Asian Para Games.

Siamand Rahman Dubai 2014 Siamand Rahman proved his worth as one of the strongest Paralympians by lifting 285.5kg in the men's +107kg to beat team mate and world record holder Mansour Pourmirzaei at the 2014 IPC Powerlifting World Championships. © • IPC
By Caryn Maconi | for the IPC

“An elite athlete should not keep stress in his mind, since at the time of lifting he may or may not be able to handle it."

The world’s strongest Paralympian, Siamand Rahman, has revealed why he did not make a long-awaited attempt at breaking through the 300kg barrier at the recent 2014 IPC Powerlifting World Championships in Dubai, UAE.

In an interview with Paralympic.org, the 28 year-old said that his coaches had advised him to settle for a 285kg world record best lift in the men’s +107kg, but that he would definitely attempt the feat at the 2014 Asian Para Games in Incheon, South Korea, from 18-24 October.

“For a long time the goal of 300kg has been on my mind,” Rahman said. “However, I comply with my coaching staff at all times and always respect their decisions. I look forward to hitting +300kg and setting a record for my country.”

Regardless of the weight lifted, Rahman’s main ambition is to reach the top of the podium in Incheon.

“I don’t think anything for the 2014 Incheon Games, but gold medal,” Rahman said. “This would be achieved only by enjoying the support of coaches and NPC [National Paralympic Committee] officials.

“In these Games, I expect to face a professional challenge in winning the gold medal and setting a new world record, as I cannot underestimate my competitors.”

Rahman has reason to be confident in his potential, as he has held is place at the top of his sport for some years.

He set his first official world record at the Guangzhou 2010 Asian Para Games, where he won a gold medal. Two years later, he was golden again at the London 2012 Paralympic Games.

For Rahman, staying relaxed is always the key to success.

“An elite athlete should not keep stress in his mind, since at the time of lifting he may or may not be able to handle it.

“For this reason, I always smile and try to remove all negative energy.”

Still, the current gold medalist knows that competition in his class is growing stronger every year. One of his biggest rivals and closest friends is Mansour Pourmirzaei, a fellow Iranian.

Pourmirzaei won gold and set a then-world record at the 2013 IPC Powerlifting Asian Open Championships with a lift of 276kg. He, too, has ambitions to break the 300kg mark.

“Mansour Pourmirzaei is one of my best friends,” Rahman said of the competitive relationship between the two. “We are always kidding, and we enjoy spending time with each other. I believe our friendship is more important than our competition.”

Rahman is fueled, not intimidated, by his competition.

“Always, I think that a new phenomenon may be born in a corner of Iran,” Rahman said. “This causes me to do my exercise at the highest level, since I tend to show my best performance during Championships.”

Rahman is glad that his toughest competition is a fellow countryman.

“Our rivalry certainly is a benefit, since the outcome is only raising our country’s flag,” Rahman said. “The main point is to save the medal for Iran. Mansour or Siamand, makes no difference.”

The 2014 Asian Para Games will feature approximately 4,500 athletes from 42 countries. Powerlifting is one of 23 sports to be contested over the 10-day competition.

WADA approves plans for Code implementation and compliance reporting

Find how a revised World Anti-Doping Code for athletes will be implemented starting in 2015.

Two people give a thumbs up and a peace sign in front of a Team officials support WADA's "Say No! to Doping" campaign at the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games. © • WADA
By WADA

“We covered a series of significant and pressing topics this weekend, particularly the matter of ensuring all signatories have the opportunity and motivation to have Code compliant rules ahead of the revised Code coming into effect at the start of 2015.”

The World Anti-Doping Association (WADA)’s Foundation Board approved key plans relating to Code implementation and Compliance reporting, and was presented with technical documents and matters relating to the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) and the addition of a substance to the 2014 Prohibited List during its meeting in Montreal, Canada, this month.

WADA’s President Sir Craig Reedie chaired his first Executive Committee and Foundation Board meetings, and was pleased at the outcome.

He said: “We covered a series of significant and pressing topics this weekend, particularly the matter of ensuring all signatories have the opportunity and motivation to have Code compliant rules ahead of the revised Code coming into effect at the start of 2015.”

World Anti-Doping Code implementation

Following the approval of the revised Code and International Standards in November 2013, WADA has been assisting and guiding signatories through a series of steps aimed at adopting the rules required to become Code compliant. This is a process that will continue throughout the remainder of 2014.

The Foundation Board confirmed that WADA would publish a list of signatories who have – and a list of signatories who have not – amended their rules appropriately and implemented them in line with the revised Code by 1 January 2015.

As part of the implementation process, the Foundation Board received an update on the Athlete Guide to the Code, a tool aimed at helping athletes understand the rules of the Code ahead of its introduction in 2015. The Guide will be published in electronic form later in 2014.

Working group on compliance reporting

As a continuation of the working group which addressed the Ineffectiveness of testing in 2012-2013, the Group produced a report on code compliance. The report considers several aspects, including: the process of becoming compliant; the measurement of compliance of quality programs; remedial and other measures to be applied when Code compliance has not been achieved by any particular signatory or group of signatories; and the recommendation that an independent group is involved in compliance assessment.

Technical Documents

As a result of the approval of the 2015 Code, the Executive Committee endorsed six Technical Documents (TDs) which will assist with the scientific analysis of samples.

Sport-specific analysis

The Foundation Board heard a report on the Technical Document in relation to sport-specific analysis. This Technical Document - under the new International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI) - establishes a risk assessment in which prohibited substances and methods are most likely to be abused in particular sport disciplines. A guideline to support the development and implementation of more effective test distribution plans is also being issued, and was discussed during the meeting.

WADA will continue to consult with International Federations (IFs) and National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs) in collaboration with the Expert Group in relation to the physiological risk assessment against the performance enhancing benefits of the prohibited substances and methods contained in the Technical Document. The Technical Document will be released after it is approved at the next Executive Committee meeting in September.

Athlete Biological Passport (ABP)

The Foundation Board considered a report on the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) Operating Guidelines, which covers both Haematological (blood) and Steroidal (urine) modules, the latter of which became operational on 1 January 2014. The integration of both modules into the Anti-Doping Administration and Management System (ADAMS) was also discussed.

It was reported that the Haematological Module – which has now been implemented by 40 ADOs – has resulted in 53 ABP-related anti-doping rule violations since 2010.

The ABP now uses the athlete’s own Testosterone/Epitestosterone (T/E) values rather than population values as a basis for evaluation, thereby ensuring a robust, more individual and fully cost-efficient system.

“The introduction of the Steroidal Module earlier this year represented a significant step forward for clean sport,” said Reedie.

“Given that every athlete can automatically have their own Steroidal Profile by providing urine samples, this module brings great strength to the overall Passport programme.

“The ABP’s strength lies in the fact that not only can it be used to directly pursue rule violations as stated in the Code, but it also allows the anti-doping community to identify and target athletes for specific analytical testing by interpreting the data in an intelligent and timely fashion.”

Amendment to the 2014 Prohibited List

Having been alerted to the substance of Xenon and its potential performance enhancing characteristics in February, the WADA List Committee discussed the matter during its April meeting.

Following its consideration, the Executive Committee approved the option to modify Section S.2.1 of the 2014 Prohibited List, which will be effective following the required three-month notice period:

S2. PEPTIDE HORMONES, GROWTH FACTORS AND RELATED SUBSTANCES

The following substances, and other substances with similar chemical structure or similar biological effect(s), are prohibited:

1. Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents [e.g. erythropoietin (EPO), darbepoetin (dEPO), hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilizers and activators (e.g. xenon, argon), methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta (CERA), peginesatide (Hematide)];

The process means that the amendment to the 2014 Prohibited List will not come into effect until three months after UNESCO has appropriately communicated the amendment to all States Parties.

Vote now for April’s IPC Athlete of the Month

Nominees include: Ali Jawad, Tatyana McFadden, Sherif Othman, Sarah Storey and Ingrid Thunem.

An athlete shows off his medal to a crowd, holding up a stuffed animal mascot with the other hand. Egypt's Sherif Othman celebrates after receiving his gold medal for winning the men's -54kg competition at the IPC Powerlifting World Championships in Dubai, UAE. © • IPC
By IPC

The public now has until 12:00 (CEST) on 9 May to vote for which athlete it thought had the best performance last month.

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) has announced its shortlist for April’s Athlete of the Month award, and the public can now vote for the winner via the poll on the www.Paralympic.org homepage.

The month’s nominees include:

Ali Jawad (Great Britain): He won gold in the men’s -59kg category at the IPC Powerlifting World Championships in Dubai, UAE, where he recorded a world-record lift of 190kg.

Tatyana McFadden (USA): Just 32 days after winning Sochi 2014 silver, she raced to victory in the London Marathon women’s wheelchair race in a course-record time of 1:45.12. A week later, she won her second straight Boston Marathon in a time of 1:35.06 on her 25th birthday.

Sherif Othman (Egypt): The double Paralympic champion broke his own world record four times on the way to winning gold in the men’s -54kg competition at the IPC Powerlifting World Championships. His best lift of 205kg was 24kg better than his previous record set just a year prior.

Sarah Storey (Great Britain): She won gold in both the women’s 3km pursuit C5 and scratch race C1-5 at the UCI Para-Cycling Track World Championships in Aguascalientes, Mexico. She set a new world record of 3:32.050 in the pursuit and also won bronze in the 500m time trial C5 event.

Ingrid Thunem (Norway): The S1 swimmer broke four world records at the 28th Internationale Deutsche Meisterschaft competition in Berlin, Germany, setting new top times in the women’s 50m freestyle, 100m freestyle, 100m backstroke and 150m individual medley.

The public now has until 12:00 (CEST) on 9 May to vote for which athlete it thought had the best performance last month.

The nominations are compiled from submissions by National Paralympic Committees (NPCs) and International Federations (IFs).

Sherif Othman

Sherif Othman

IPC Powerlifting Dubai

IPC Powerlifting Dubai