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MCFADDEN Tatyana
Sport Para athletics, Para biathlon, Para cross-country
NPC United States   
GenderWomen
Age29
Place of BirthLeningrad, URS
Height1.65 m
Weight 48 kg
Human Interest
Impairment Information
Type of Impairment
Spinal Cord Injuries
Origin of Impairment
Congenital
Classification
LW11
Further Personal Information
Residence
Champaign, IL, USA
Occupation
Athlete, Student
Languages
English
Sport Specific Information
When and where did you begin this sport?
She began the sport through the Bennett Blazers programme in Baltimore, MD, United States of America.
Why this sport?
She tried a number of sports, including wheelchair basketball, swimming, ice hockey and scuba diving before she fell in love with wheelchair racing.
Club / Team
University of Illinois Wheelchair Racing Team: Champaign, IL, USA
Name of coach
Adam Bleakney [club], USA
Training Regime
She covers over 100 miles in her wheelchair each week.
Senior International Debut
Year
2004
Competing for
United States
Tournament
Paralympic Games
Location
Athens, GRE
General Interest
Nicknames
Beast (nbcolympics.com, 09 Jun 2016)
Hobbies
Charity projects, sport. (Facebook page, 04 Sep 2016)
Memorable sporting achievement
Winning medals at the Paralympic Games in 2004, 2012 and 2016. (Athlete, 17 Jul 2017)
Most influential person in career
Her parents. (Athlete, 17 Jul 2017)
Hero / Idol
Canadian wheelchair racer Chantal Petitclerc. (Athlete, 17 Jul 2017)
Sporting philosophy / motto
"You have the power to be anything you want to be." (Athlete, 17 Jul 2017)
Awards and honours
She was named in the '30 Under 30 Class Of 2017' by Forbes magazine. (teamusa.org, 03 Jan 2017)

She was voted the Best Female Athlete of the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro by the United States Olympic Committee [USOC]. (paralympic.org, 29 Sep 2016)

She was presented with the Whang Youn Dai Achievement Award at the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. The award is given to the athlete who has performed at an outstanding level and overcome adversity. (swimmingworldmagazine.com, 15 Sep 2016)

She received the Excellence in Sports Performance Yearly Award [ESPY] for Best Female Athlete with a Disability in 2016. (baltimoresun.com, 14 Jul 2016)

She was named the 2015 Female Paralympic Athlete of the Year by the USOC. (olympics.nbcsports.com, 11 Dec 2015)

She received the 2015 Wilma Rudolph Courage award from the Women's Sports Foundation. (teamusa.org, 20 Oct 2015)

She received the Juan Antonio Samaranch International Olympic Committee [IOC] Disabled Athlete award in 2015. (insidethegames.biz, 25 Aug 2015)

She was named Sportsperson of the Year with a Disability at the 2015 Laureus Sports Awards. (rio2016.org.br, 15 Apr 2015)

She was the named Female Athlete of the Month for November 2013, March 2014, November 2014 and April 2015 by USOC. (teamusa.org, 06 Dec 2013; 06 May 2014; 09 Dec 2014; 08 May 2015)

She was named the 2014 Female Para-Athlete of the Year by USA Track and Field [USATF]. (insidethegames.biz, 21 Dec 2014)
Other sports
She has represented the United States of America in para-cross country skiing. She won silver in the 1km sprint at the 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi. (teamusa.org, 18 Apr 2016)
Famous relatives
Her sister Hannah has represented the United States of America in wheelchair racing. She won gold in the T54 400m at the 2015 Parapan American Games in Toronto, ON, Canada. (SportsDeskOnline, 05 Sep 2016; teamusa.org, 01 Jul 2016)
Impairment
She was born with spina bifida and is paralysed from the waist down. (Athlete, 17 Jul 2017; bbc.co.uk, 12 Jul 2013)
Other information
INTERNATIONAL FIRSTS
In 2013 she became the first person to win the Boston, London, Chicago and New York marathons in the same year. She also became the first woman to win six gold medals at one world championships, when she claimed victory in the 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m, 1500m and 5000m at the 2013 edition in Lyon, France. (insidethegames.biz, 03 Nov 2013)

BOSTON MARATHON ATTACK
She won the Boston Marathon in April 2013. Two bomb explosions went off just after she had finished mandatory drug testing and a round of media interviews, killing three people and injuring almost 200. She was determined not to let the attack impact her desire to race, and set off the next day to compete in the London Marathon. "We can't let bad people control the freedom of our movement. I trust London will have all the security measures in place and I'm not afraid to run. I will be wearing a black ribbon as we mourn such loss. But I'd like to wear a white ribbon too, to show that people know that in tragedy there's always hope for the future." (teamusa.org, 19 Apr 2013)

MOVE TO THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
She was born paralysed from the waist down due to spina bifida, and was abandoned at an orphanage in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. She did not have a wheelchair, so she learned to walk using her hands. At age six she was adopted by Deborah McFadden, who had visited the orphanage as part of her work as a commissioner for the US Department of Health and Human Sciences. (teamusa.org, 01 Jul 2016; Baltimore Sun, 08 Oct 2008)

LEGAL BATTLE
In 2006 her adoptive mother Deborah McFadden filed a lawsuit against the Howard County Board of Education in the United States of America. The board had ruled that while it was fine for Tatyana to practise and travel with her able-bodied teammates, she was limited to racing in events designated for wheelchair athletes. School officials said that allowing wheelchair racers and runners to compete at the same time could cause safety problems and change the nature of the sport. The McFaddens had sought permission for their daughter to compete only at the same time as the other runners, not directly against them. She was eventually cleared to compete in Howard County track meets. Known as 'Tatyana's Law', it was initially used in a few US states but became a national law in 2013. (bbc.co.uk, 12 Jul 2013; The Washington Post, 19 Apr 2006)

Competition Highlights (historical)
Paralympic Games - Para athletics
Rank Year Event Result
2 2004 100m T54 16.69 
3 2004 200m T54 30.48 
5 2004 400m T54 56.24 
9 2004 800m T54 1:55.15 
6 2008 100m T54 16.62
2 2008 400m T54 53.49
2 2008 200m T54 28.43
2 2008 800m T54 1:46.95
3 2008 4 x 100m Relay T53-54 1:02.16
1 2012 400m T54 52.97
1 2012 800m T54 1:47.01
1 2012 1500m T54 3:36.42
3 2012 100m T54 16.15
9 2012 Marathon T54 1:58:47
2 2016 100m T54 16.13
1 2016 400m T54 53.30
1 2016 1500m T54 3:22.50
1 2016 5000m T54 11:54.07
  2016 4 x 400m Relay T53-54  DSQ
1 2016 800m T54 1:44.73
2 2016 Marathon T54 1:38:44
World Championships - Para athletics
Rank Year Event Result
1 2006 100m T54 16.31
2 2006 200m T54 29.25
2 2006 400m T54 54.25
4 2006 800m T54 1:55.91
3 2011 100m T54 16.83
1 2011 200m T54 29.33
1 2011 800m T54 1:51.10
2 2011 4 x 400m Relay T53-54 3:57.39
1 2011 1500m T54 3:36.20
1 2011 400m T54 54.88
1 2013 200m T54 28.69
1 2013 5000m T54 12:08.07
1 2013 800m T54 1:44.44
1 2013 100m T54 16.42
1 2013 1500m T54 3:34.06
1 2013 400m T54 53.74
1 2017 200m T54 28.08
1 2017 1500m T54 3:25.23
1 2017 400m T54 53.74
1 2017 800m T54 1:47.82
Paralympic Games - Para cross-country
Rank Year Event Result
5 2014 12km - Sitting 43:13.8 
2 2014 1km Sprint - Sitting 2:45.7
6 2014 4 x 2.5km Relay Mixed 29:06.7
7 2014 5km - Sitting 18:34.7
World Championships - Para cross-country
Rank Year Event Result
8 2014/2015 12km - Sitting 43:46.0
6 2014/2015 1km Sprint - Sitting  
7 2014/2015 4 x 2.5km Relay Mixed 34:47.0
9 2014/2015 5km - Sitting 17:08.8
Marathon World Championships - Para athletics
Rank Year Event Result
1 2015 Marathon T53/54 1:41:14