Wheelchair Tennis to Have First Paralympic-Only Venue

With its central location and first-class modern facilities, Eton Manor will offer some great facilities for the Wheelchair Tennis venue. 08 Jun 2012
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An aerial view of 12 tennis courts

The aerial view of the Olympic Park showing Eton Manor.

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By IPC

“I think this venue’s fantastic, you’ve got a great Stadium, you know 5,000 people to come and watch."

The Wheelchair Tennis competition at the London 2012 Paralympic Games will be held at

Eton Manor in the Olympic Park from 1-8 September.

It is the first venue ever built solely for the Paralympic Games, with Olympic Tennis taking place on the other side of London at Wimbledon.

“It’s just fantastic; it’s close to the Olympic Park,” said Clare Wood, London 2012 Sport Manager for Tennis and Wheelchair Tennis. “It’s got great capacity for the crowds to come in and watch and the facilities are first class.”

Eton Manor will feature nine competition courts: Centre Court will have a gross capacity of 5,000; court No. 1 will have a gross capacity of 3,000; court No. 2 will have a gross capacity of 1,000; and courts 3–8 will each have a gross capacity of 250. There will also be four practice courts.

“We’re going to have eight days of competition with the best Wheelchair Tennis players in the world over three events with six medals at stake,” said Wood. “So we’re really looking forward to some exciting and competitive matches.”

Great Britain’s Lucy Shuker was impressed with the courts when she competed at the London Prepares test event in May.

“I think this venue’s fantastic, you’ve got a great Stadium, you know 5,000 people to come and watch.

“It’s also quite close in terms of people to court, you’ve got a really good view. As players, the courts are really good. They’re fast and good to move on.”

This brand new venue is built on the same site as the old Eton Manor Sports Club, a community sporting facility that was a fixture in the area in the 1900’s that provided an opportunity for underprivileged children to take part in sport.

The new site is fully accessible with all courts on ground level and accessible seating areas on all courts.

After the Games, the venue will be transformed again to give it four indoor courts, six outdoor courts, plus two full-size competition hockey pitches.

“It’s going to be quite a legacy for the area,” Wood said.

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