Montreal 2013
IPC Swimming World Championships
12-18 August

World’s best swimmers show support for clean sport

Paralympic and World Champions from Canada, Brazil, Great Britain and the USA put their names to anti-doping day at IPC Swimming World Champs. 17 Jul 2013
Imagen
Benoit Huot and Valerie Grand Maison WADA campaign

Canadian swimmers Benoit Huot and Valerie Grand Maison show their support for the IPC and WADA anti-doping day taking place on 13 August, 2013.

ⒸSwimming Canada
By IPC

“I want to make my dreams come true not by crossing the lines, but with my willpower. If it has to hurt, let it hurt. If you have to cry, then cry. If you have to bleed, then bleed. But I´ll always look back and see a clean and fair game, so I´ll be able to be proud of myself”

Six of the world’s most successful para-swimmers will be taking part in a day of awareness for clean sport on 13 August at the 2013 IPC Swimming World Championships in Montreal, Canada.

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) and World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) have teamed up to create a day dedicated to raising awareness of anti-doping and to call for athletes to compete clean in all sports.

Say NO! to Doping is an awareness campaign that was launched by WADA to encourage sports and anti-doping organisations to show their commitment to doping-free sport. Sport and anti-doping communities can incorporate the Say NO! to Doping logo and other green elements throughout competition venues, promotional material and sports equipment to promote the Play True message of respect and fair play.

All swimmers will be encouraged to show their support for a level playing field by wearing swimming caps and temporary tattoos displaying the Say No! to Doping and IPC logos.

Reigning Paralympic and world champion in the 100m butterfly S10, 50m & 100m freestyle S10 and world champion in the 400m freestyle and 100m backstroke S10, Andre Brasil of Brazil said:

“I want to make my dreams come true not by crossing the lines, but with my willpower. If it has to hurt, let it hurt. If you have to cry, then cry. If you have to bleed, then bleed. But I´ll always look back and see a clean and fair game, so I´ll be able to be proud of myself”

Brasil will be in action on 13 August in the 400m free S10 as well as in the following days where he will go up against fellow Paralympic and world champion Canadian Benoit Huot, who will be his biggest competitor in Montreal.

“I've always been an advocate for the importance of clean, equal and fair sport for everyone. These values are unique.

“Let's all continue to work together and make sure that our sport is clean and transparent” said Huot.

Reigning Paralympic and world champion in the 100m butterfly S8, 100m breaststroke SB8, 200m individual medley SM8 and 100m and 400m freestyle S8 Jessica Long of the USA said:

“I say no to doping because I respect myself and my competitors. When I am in the pool, I want to show the world that I am abled, not disabled. I can compete clean and still accomplish everything that I put my mind to.”

Eleanor Simmonds, British Paralympic champion in the 200m individual medley SM6 and 400m freestyle S6, and world champion in the 50m, 100m and 400m freestyle and 200m individual medley will also be competing in Montreal:

“It is really important for athletes to stay clean so that sport is equal and fair for everybody. As elite swimmers we are role models for millions of young sports people around the world.

“That makes it even more important to take the spirit of fair play and use it as a big inspiration to train really hard to achieve great things,” Simmonds said.

Canadian Valerie Grand’Maison and Brit Josef Craig will also be wearing branded swimming caps and temporary tattoos on the day.

On 13 August IPC President Sir Philip Craven and WADA Director General David Howman will attend a press conference where they will give their views on the importance of clean sport and a doping free culture.

“Say NO! to Doping is an effective campaign that allows athletes and organizations to demonstrate that they are behind clean sport. Hosting a dedicated Say NO! to Doping day here in Montreal provides the perfect opportunity for the sporting and anti-doping community to show its commitment to real sport that consists of fair play and respect,” David Howman said.

The Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES) will provide third-party anti-doping services for the World Championships, bringing more than 20 years of experience and the latest anti-doping techniques in urine and blood sample collection.

Doping control officers from the Canadian Anti-Doping Program will collect urine and blood samples before and during the World Championships. In addition, CCES staff will be on site to provide outreach services to athletes and access to helpful anti-doping information.

“The CCES is pleased to participate in this effort by the IPC and WADA to promote clean sport,” says Paul Melia, President and CEO of the CCES. “Athletes want clean sport. We are committed to helping them be as well informed as possible in their quest to compete clean,” adds Melia.

There will be free hand-held paper fans and temporary tattoos available for spectators on the day which will display the Say No! to Doping and IPC logos, as well as a Twitter and Facebook competition providing the opportunity to win signed caps worn by world and Paralympic champions once the Championships have concluded.

The 2013 IPC Swimming World Championships are taking place from 12-18 August in Montreal, Canada. Featuring around 500 athletes from nearly 60 countries, it will be the biggest gathering of international swimmers since London 2012.

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