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17194-Rheed McCracken photo

Rheed McCracken

Athletics
2
2

Biography

Impairment information

Origin of Impairment
Congenital
Classification
T34

Further personal information

Residence
Newcastle, NSW, AUS
Occupation
Athlete, Model, Student
Languages
English

Sport specific information

When and where did you begin this sport?
He first practised the sport at age 13 in Sydney, NSW, Australia. He began competing in Para athletics in 2005, and took up wheelchair racing in 2010.
Why this sport?
He initially competed in ambulant events, but after multiple operations decided to start using a wheelchair at age 13. He later had a chance meeting with Australian television personality David Koch, as they were sitting next to each other on an aeroplane. They began talking about Australian wheelchair racer Kurt Fearnley, McCracken's hero. Koch offered him the opportunity to compete in a race featuring Fearnley in Sydney, NSW, Australia.
Club / Team
New South Wales Institute of Sport: Sydney, NSW, AUS
Name of coach
Andrew Dawes [personal], AUS
Training Regime
He trains in a group with Australian wheelchair racers Luke Bailey, Christie Dawes, and Aimee Fisher in Newcastle, New South Wales.

General interest

Memorable sporting achievement
Winning a silver medal in the men's T34 100m at the Paralympic Games in 2012 and 2016. (Athlete, 06 Nov 2019)
Most influential person in career
Coach Andrew Dawes. (Athlete, 06 Nov 2019)
Hero / Idol
His family. (Athlete, 06 Nov 2019)
Sporting philosophy / motto
"If you ain't first, you're last." (paralympic.org.au, 30 Sep 2019)
Awards and honours
In 2016 he was named Junior Male Athlete of the Year by the Sporting Wheelies and Disabled Association in Queensland, Australia. (news-mail.com.au, 27 Nov 2016)

In 2015 he was named Male Sportsperson with an Impairment of the Year at the Bundaberg Regional Sports Awards in Australia. (bundaberg.qld.gov.au, 04 Jul 2015)

In 2012 he was named Junior Athlete of the Year by the Australian Paralympic Committee [APC]. He shared the award with Para swimmer Maddison Elliott. (paralympic.org.au, 05 Apr 2013)
Ambitions
To win a gold medal at the 2020 Paralympic Games in Tokyo. (nswis.com, 07 Sep 2020; bundabergnow.com, 07 Sep 2020)
Impairment
He was born with cerebral palsy, affecting both of his legs. At age three he underwent tibial rotation surgery, allowing his muscles to move with less restriction. After further surgery at age 13 he began using a wheelchair. (Facebook page, 26 Jan 2017)
Other information
TATTOOS
He gets tattoos to commemorate his athletic achievements. "I actually look at my arm and try to find new spaces where I can put a tattoo. There's a Big Ben tattoo which was from my first Paralympic Games in 2012 in London. I also have my racing numbers from the London and Rio Games. There is also a Christ the Redeemer tattoo and also tattoos involving my family. My Superman is solely dedicated to Tyson, a very close friend who sadly passed away and was a tremendous sprinter. He wasn't a wheelchair athlete - just a great person who never got to reach his true potential." (crfashionbook.com, 04 Mar 2018; news-mail.com.au, 14 Jul 2017; Facebook page, 15 Sep 2016)

TOKYO AIM
He represented Australia at the Paralympic Games in 2012 and 2016, winning a total of two silver medals and two bronze medals. "I learn something new at every Games I go to. In London, as the rookie, I went into it with no pressure, and then I went into Rio with all of added pressures that I probably put on myself, so I just want to enjoy this one [in Tokyo]. It's been a crazy year and I'll just let things play out the way they are and not get too worked up. I would love to say third time's the charm and of course I'm going to go into this to win and give it everything I've got, but at the same time I also want to enjoy it and not be so stressed about what the future holds." (bundabergnow.com, 07 Sep 2020)

FURTHER EDUCATION
In 2020 he started a technical and further education course [TAFE] course with a view to studying for a bachelor's degree in pharmacy. (bundabergnow.com, 07 Sep 2020)

Results

Unit Date Rank
London 2012 Paralympic Games (London, Great Britain)
Event Medal Unit Date Rank
Men's 200 m T34 Heat 2 2012-09-04 2
Men's 200 m T34 Final Round 2012-09-04 3
Men's 100 m T34 Heat 2 2012-09-08 2
Men's 100 m T34 Final Round 2012-09-08 2
IPC Athletics World Championships (Lyon, France)
Event Medal Unit Date Rank
Men's 200 m T34 Semifinal 2 2013-07-21 3
Men's 200 m T34 Final 1 2013-07-22 2
Men's 100 m T34 Semifinal 1 2013-07-23 2
Men's 100 m T34 Final 1 2013-07-24 2
Men's 800 m T34 Final 1 2013-07-25 3
Men's 400 m T34 Semifinal 2 2013-07-26 2
Men's 400 m T34 Final 1 2013-07-27 2
IPC Athletics 2015 World Championships (Doha, Qatar)
Event Medal Unit Date Rank
Men's 400 m T34 Heat 1 2015-10-23 6
Men's 400 m T34 Final 1 2015-10-24 5
Men's 800 m T34 Heat 1 2015-10-25 4
Men's 800 m T34 Final 1 2015-10-26 5
Men's 100 m T34 Heat 1 2015-10-27 4
Men's 100 m T34 Final 1 2015-10-28 4
Men's 200 m T34 Heat 2 2015-10-30 7
Men's 200 m T34 Final 1 2015-10-31 6
Rio 2016 Paralympic Games (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
Event Medal Unit Date Rank
Men's 100 m T34 Heat 1 2016-09-11 1
Men's 100 m T34 Final Round 2016-09-12 2
Men's 800 m T34 Heat 1 2016-09-13 2
Men's 800 m T34 Final Round 2016-09-14 3
World Para Athletics Championships London 2017 (London, Great Britain)
Event Medal Unit Date Rank
Men's 100 m T34 Final 1 2017-07-15 2
Men's 100 m T34 Heat 1 2017-07-15 2
Men's 800 m T34 Final 1 2017-07-20 4
Men's 200 m T34 Final 1 2017-07-21 3