Mary Wilson

Athletics

Biography

Impairment information

Origin of Impairment
Acquired

Further personal information

Languages
English

Sport specific information

When and where did you begin this sport?
She took up Para sports in 2014.
Why this sport?
"I was discharged from the army in 2012 and found myself in a very dark place. I wasn't sure where my life was going and my illness could have made me housebound. I decided I would get involved with sports. Because of the MS [multiple sclerosis], I signed up for the Invictus Games 2014."

General interest

Sporting philosophy / motto
"Live every day by: 'What have I done today to make myself proud?'" (heraldscotland.com, 12 Jan 2019)
Ambitions
To compete at the 2020 Paralympic Games in Tokyo. (badmintonscotland.org.uk, 19 Mar 2019)
Impairment
She tore the bicep muscle in her right shoulder and broke her cheek bone and two toes on her right foot while on a military horse riding course in 2000. Her injuries resulted in arthritis and limited movement in her right shoulder. In 2004 she was diagnosed with remitting multiple sclerosis, which affects her coordination and strength. (dailyrecord.co.uk, 01 Sep 2014)
Other information
ARMED FORCES
She served as a psychiatric nurse for 20 years in the Queen Alexandra's Royal Army Nursing Corps before being medically discharged in December 2012. (radiotimes.com, 11 Sep 2014)

CLIMBING MOUNTAINS
After she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis [MS], she built up her fitness through running and then took up mountain climbing. She set herself a goal to climb all the mountains in Scotland. "It helped me process it and got me fitter. I started climbing mountains a year later and made it my mission to climb all 282 Munros – mountains over 3000ft high – in Scotland, something I achieved in 2013." (express.co.uk, 17 Sep 2017)

INVICTUS CAPTAIN
In 2014 she was field athletics captain for the British Armed Forces at the first Invictus Games in London, and she won the British team's first gold medal in the 50m freestyle swimming event. "I was the only female captain out of all the countries, standing there with all these big muscly men around me. It was a life-defining moment for me. I found something that I was truly good at that I could be proud of again." (express.co.uk, 17 Sep 2017)